Thursday, 29 September 2011

Missouri, where Ice Cream cones are a State dessert



Welcome to Missouri, a land of fertile plains, rolling hills, well-watered prairies and historic rivers.

Two of this countr


y's greatest waterways, the Missisipi River on the state's eastern border, and the Missouri River, which winds across the state, helped Missouri become a supply center for many of the westward-bound settlers of the nation's early years. Shipping along the navigable rivers boosted the state's status as an agricultural

supplier. Barges and steamboats used the waterways to move goods and people. River towns boomed. Railroads continued to fuel the growth of Missouri as a large transportation center. Today more than a dozen major railroads carry goods through the state, and transcontinental airlines keep passengers and cargo on the move.

Missouri is called the "Show me state" in use in the late 18

90's. It's not known

where and how this nickname originates. Other names include: the Lead State, Cave State, Bullion State, etc.

Capital City: Jefferson Ci

ty

State Musical Instrument: Fiddle


State Song: "Missouri Waltz"

Tree nut: Nut of the Eastern walnut tree

State bird: Bluebird

State Insect: Honeyee

Floram emblem: Hawthorn Blossom

State animal: Missouri Mule

State Dessert: Ice Cream cone

Missuori day: 3rd Wednesday in October

State Official dance: Square Dance

Missouri is borded by Iowa on the north and by Arkansas and Tennessee on the south. Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee border Missouri on the east and Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma border Missouri on the west.

The highest point in Missouri is Taum Sauk Mountain at 1,772 feet above sea level. The lowest point in Missouri is the St. Francis River at 230 feet above sea level.

The major rivers are: Current River, Mississippi River, Missouri River, Osage River, St. Francis River. And the major lakes are: Lake of the Ozarks, Table Rock Lake, Clearwater Lake, Lake Wappapello.

Centered on red, white and blue fields is the Missouri state seal. It is encircled by a blue band with tewnty-four stars representing the number of states in 1821. The stars in the inner circle having the same meaning. Two huge grizzly bears support the circular shield in the center which has three parts:

1. The motto: "United we stand, divided we fall"
2. The right section representing the United States
3. The left section containing a moon representing a new state and a grizzly bear standing for courage
4. The flag was designed by Mrs. Marie Elizabeth Oliver of Cape Girardeue, Missouri. Flag adopted in 1913.

The Origin of the state name: named after Missouri Indian tribe whose name means "twon of the large canoes.

Sources:

www.netstate.com/states/symb/mo_symb.htm
www.sos.mo.gov/symbols/symbols.asp?symbol=folk
www.50states.com/missouri.htm





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